Darebin Art Collection

Clouds Are The Dust Of His Feet #1

Public Description: 

Bindi Cole Chocka is a Wathaurong woman who lives and works in Melbourne. Clouds Are The Dust Of His Feet #1, was exhibited at Bundoora Homestead's group show Horizons in 2014. It is part of a suite of photographic works that explores the artist's identity, history and faith as she forgives herself and others for past wrongs. The photograph's title is taken from a passage from the Bible (Nahum 1:3): The LORD is slow to anger but great in power; the LORD will not leave the guilty unpunished. His way is in the whirlwind and the storm, and clouds are the dust of his feet.

Cole Chocka says "I used to be a victim of my own life, like everything was everyone else’s fault, building my identity on all the wrongs that had been committed against me. Meanwhile, I had turned into a pretty horrible person, my heart had become hardened and I was living a life of destruction and pain. It was then that I had a revelation. I was living as the victim. In that very moment, I came to a place where I no longer desired justice for what had happened to me, but had realised I needed forgiveness for what I had done and who I had become. From that place, I was able to begin to forgive others. So I chose to forgive".

Clouds Are The Dust Of His Feet #1 © Bindi Cole Chocka.

Bridge Merri Creek

Public Description: 

In Bridge Merri Creek, Katherine Hattam continues her exploration of local waterways and their locations. This work on plywood depicts the bridge over Merri Creek on High Street, Northcote with accompanying trees and powerlines and the much ignored cyclists dismount sign. It is surrounded by a repertoire of recurring domestic motifs significant to the artist including chairs, clocks and a shopping basket, creating a psychological layering of memory via personally symbolic objects.

Hattam’s art practice comprises drawing, collage, printmaking and sculpture. She employs a contemplative process in revealing the relationships and tensions between objects, space and placement. Hattam has exhibited widely as a solo artist as well as in group shows for over five decades. She has won the Robert Jacks Drawing Prize (2006), Banyule Works on Paper Art Award (2005) and has been short-listed in the Dobell Drawing Prize, National Works on Paper Prize and Arthur Guy Memorial Painting Prize. Her work is represented in public, corporate, educational and private collections such as the National Gallery of Australia, state and regional art galleries, The Darling Foundation, Smorgen Collection, Artbank, Queen Victoria Hospital, National Australia Bank and La Trobe University Museum of Art.

Bridge Merri Creek © Katherine Hattam

Panther on the prowl

Public Description: 

Paul Wood’s sculptural assemblages combine rejected ceramic objects, kitchen crockery and pre-loved porcelain animals in uncanny and surprising ways. The fusion of these otherwise unrelated items create playful narratives that transcend mere nostalgia and become small monuments to their curious past. Paul’s reimagining of domestic crockery of a bygone era, create masterful compositions of form, from a variety of angles.

Paul Wood’s work has been acknowledged through significant awards such as the Sydney Myer Ceramic Emerging Artist Award (2010), Australia Council for the Arts Barcelona Residency (2010) and the Manningham Victorian Ceramic Art Award (2011). His work has been included in major exhibitions including at ACCA, Melbourne and Icheon World Ceramic Centre Korea. In 2016 Paul’s work was shown in ‘Tempest’, curated by Juliana Engberg, at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery.

Reeds Japan

Public Description: 

Alice Wormald creates paintings out of a compulsion to construct strange natural spaces where surface and depth, representation, abstraction, naturalism and converge. The works often develop through a process of image collection and collage with a focus on natural imagery such as rocks, plants and geological formations. These images are reconfigured to create a compelling encounter with depth, object and landscape. By accentuating and distorting formal elements such as composition and scale, the pictorial space is disrupted, demanding intense observation up close while simultaneously directing the viewer to make sense of the ‘landscape’ before them.

Alice Wormald is an artist based in Melbourne who has held multiple solo exhibitions in Melbourne and Sydney, most recently ‘Inversion Scenes’ (2017) at Daine Singer and ‘Offerings’ (2016) at Gallery 9, Sydney. Recent group exhibitions include ‘Gardening is not a Rational Act’ curated by Tai Snaith at c3 Contemporary Art Space, ‘Visiting Painting’ at Horsham Regional Art Gallery and ‘Imagined Worlds’ at the Hawthorn Town Hall Gallery. She has been a finalist in many prizes including the Geelong Contemporary Art Prize (2014) and the Darebin Art Prize (2016). Her work is held in numerous public and private collections.

Broken

Public Description: 

Working in both earthenware and porcelain, Ray explores the products of 18th-century ceramic manufacturers including Wedgwood, Spode and Sèvres as representations of conspicuous consumption. Broken explores notions of display and privilege inherent in these objects as it questions the role of ceramics in society as both everyday objects and symbols of wealth and status. Ray's work presents a unique opportunity to critique the role of ceramics in our domestic lives and thereby resonates with the thematic of ‘home’.

David Ray has held numerous solo exhibitions including ‘David Ray Retrospective – They don’t make ‘em like that anymore’, Ararat Regional Art Gallery, 2012; ‘Infinite Variety’, Nellie Castan Gallery, 2012; ‘David Ray Contemporary Ceramics’, Bayside Arts & Cultural Centre, 2011 and ‘Vessel’, Nellie Castan Gallery, 2010. He has been the recipient of grants, awards and residencies including an Australian Council Development Grant and National Exhibition Touring Support. His work is held in public collections across Australia, including the National Gallery of Victoria, Swan Hill Regional Gallery and the Shepparton Art Museum.

Victoria's Secret

Public Description: 

DAMP is a Melbourne based artist collective established in 1995. The group make groundbreaking artworks that address the relationship between artist and audience. In 1999 the group staged a histrionic series of conflicts, which escalated into a brawl in the gallery window of Gertrude Contemporary. In 2009 the group constructed a monumental faux-marble plinth on which local collectives could meet as part of APT6 at the Queensland Art Gallery. The current members of DAMP are Narelle Desmond, Sharon Goodwin, Debra Kunda and James Lynch.

DAMP produced Victoria’s Secret alongside a suite of ceramic based artworks, which on close inspection are a patchwork of broken fragments that form the basis of The Harrison Collection. The Harrison Collection and Victoria’s Secret, began with the simple gesture of breaking a plate. Each member of DAMP painted a fragment of this plate and it was glued back together. For two years DAMP gathered found objects, personal effects and references and transformed these into a sculptural patchwork. Each of the 40 or so objects in the series were a result of the collaboration, demarcated by individual hands. In the case of Victoria’s Secret, a ready-made statue was carved into pieces. DAMP members used the American cartoonist and musician Robert Crumb and a Bauhaus Tapestry as reference material for this piece.

Lane behind Northcote Theatre

Public Description: 

The photograph, Lane behind Northcote Theatre, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The Northcote Theatre was established at 216 High Street (corner of High Street and Bastings Street) in June 1912 by the Northcote Picture Theatre Company. It was designed by local architect, Edward Twentyman, jnr. and remains perhaps the earliest surviving picture theatre designed in Victoria. It possessed a balcony, stalls, its own electricity generator and a stage which was adaptable for vaudeville. For many businesses, laneways such as this one photographed by Wadelton, allowed rear access for deliveries and waste collection. It later beacame part of the Hoyts' chain of cinemas and while it was operating as a cinema, it was used as the setting for the film "Night Club" in 1952. The cinema closed in 1960. It has been used as a dance studio and having been extensively restored and refurbished to its original character it is now used as a reception centre. http://heritage.darebinlibraries.vic.gov.au/article/521

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Lane behind Northcote Theatre © David Wadelton

Looking toward Westgarth Street from South Crescent

Public Description: 

The photograph, Looking toward Westgarth Street from South Crescent, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The background to this image shows a vacant lot, where Leeds Dyeworks once stood and where an apartment block stands today.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Looking toward Westgarth Street from South Crescent © David Wadelton

Northland

Public Description: 

The photograph, Northland , is from a series of photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

Northland Shopping Centre was originally built and owned by the Myer Emporium. When it opened for business on Tuesday 4th of October 1966, it was Victoria's first and largest indoor mall shopping centre. The shopping centre was built on land sold by the Housing Commission that once housed the migrant camp of nissen huts built in 1952 to accommodate the influx of new Australians to Preston. The original shopping centre consisted of 3 malls radiating north, east and west from a centre stage area. Water features, such as this one, were prominant in the original design and construction of the centre however there aren't any existing fountains remaining on the site. It would have approximately 80 tenants and was estimated to cost 9 million pounds to complete. The site was bounded by Murray Rd, Hannah St, Wood St and Darebin Creek. In 1982 Northland was sold to the Gandel Group of Companies. Since then the shopping centre has had numerous expansions and renovations.http://heritage.darebinlibraries.vic.gov.au/article/393

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Northland © David Wadelton

Epping line train

Public Description: 

The photograph, Epping line train , is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The image of a woman smoking a cigarette in a train carriage is reminiscent of a time gone by, before smoking was outlawed in public places. It was commonplace for people to smoke at work, at their desks, in meetings, in restaurants, at parks and in public transport.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Epping line train © David Wadelton