Darebin Art Collection

Puppy (2)

Public Description: 

In Puppy (2) Natalie Thomas pays homage to Jeff Koon’s Puppy (1992) as she explores the interaction between humans, pets, science and our experience of nature. Thomas uses tiny shells to cover a plaster spaniel creating a fur effect that references the folk art traditions of seaside town mementos, and a childhood spent growing up in Queensland.

From classical antiquity, the shell or mollusc has been regarded as one of the most amazing achievements of nature, and has frequently been imitated in works of art. The architecture and astonishing ornamentation of shells are used in this work to compose an external covering suggestive of armour on forms; recognisable as a puppy. The use of shells to represent form and fur is a means through which complex human experience is distilled down to simple motifs and ideas; in this instance the experience of walking with a dog on a beach. Research assures us of the significant emotional benefits of pet ownership. Whether the mechanism is touch, exercise, attachment, non-evaluative social support, or some combination of these, the human connection to the non-human animal world is enjoyed by many and merits our close consideration.

Natalie Thomas has a diverse and independent visual and performing arts practice encompassing sculpture assemblage, gardening and photography. She works with multiple themes which are driven by an interest in the media landscape, consumption and popular culture. Thomas has exhibited extensively as an individual and as part of a collaborative project ‘nat&ali’ at the National Gallery of Victoria, Museum of Contemporary Art (Sydney), Institute of Modern Art (Brisbane) and Art Basel 2010 (Florida, USA). She is the recipient of the William and Winifred Bowness Prize for Photography, Monash Gallery of Art (2008) and a winner of the Darebin Art Show (2013).

Puppy (2) © Natalie Thomas.

Earthenware 'Remued' cylinder vase, green / beige / blue

Public Description: 

This small slightly ribbed earthenware cylinder vase with a flared foot was produced in the ‘Remued’ ware range introduced by Premier Pottery, between 1941 and 1955 and is known to be part of the Later Series. It is characterised by its drip-glaze style, and in this case, colours of green, beige and blue have been used.

The 'Remued' ware in the City of Darebin art collection is significant as it represents fine examples from the nationally recognised twentieth century art pottery, Premier Pottery, that was based in the Victorian suburb of Preston from 1929-1956. Of great influence to the development of this range was the potter Margaret Kerr (1898-1958), who began introducing Australian imagery into pottery design.

'Remued' was one of Premier's most successful and defining ventures, a feat made particularly remarkable in that it survived the financial strains of the Great Depression. The work of Premier is significant in that although the firm was producing large quantities of commercial ware, they maintained a studio approach to their work, preferring handmade items as opposed to the use of plaster moulds.

Earthenware 'Remued' egg-cup vase, green / brown

Public Description: 

This small angular ‘egg-cup’ earthenware vase was produced in the ‘Remued’ ware range introduced by Premier Pottery, between 1941 and 1955 and is known to be part of the Later Series. It is characterised by its drip-glaze style, and in this case, colours of green and brown have been used.

The 'Remued' ware in the City of Darebin art collection is significant as it represents fine examples from the nationally recognised twentieth century art pottery, Premier Pottery, that was based in the Victorian suburb of Preston from 1929-1956. Of great influence to the development of this range was the potter Margaret Kerr (1898-1958), who began introducing Australian imagery into pottery design.

'Remued' was one of Premier's most successful and defining ventures, a feat made particularly remarkable in that it survived the financial strains of the Great Depression. The work of Premier is significant in that although the firm was producing large quantities of commercial ware, they maintained a studio approach to their work, preferring handmade items as opposed to the use of plaster moulds.

Earthenware 'Remued' baluster-shaped vase, green / brown / blue

Public Description: 

This small plump baluster-shaped earthenware vase was produced in the ‘Remued’ ware range introduced by Premier Pottery, between 1941 and 1955 and is known to be part of the Later Series. It is characterised by its drip-glaze style, and in this case, colours of green, brown and blue have been used.

The 'Remued' ware in the City of Darebin art collection is significant as it represents fine examples from the nationally recognised twentieth century art pottery, Premier Pottery, that was based in the Victorian suburb of Preston from 1929-1956. Of great influence to the development of this range was the potter Margaret Kerr (1898-1958), who began introducing Australian imagery into pottery design.

'Remued' was one of Premier's most successful and defining ventures, a feat made particularly remarkable in that it survived the financial strains of the Great Depression. The work of Premier is significant in that although the firm was producing large quantities of commercial ware, they maintained a studio approach to their work, preferring handmade items as opposed to the use of plaster moulds.

Earthenware 'Remued' globe-shaped bowl, brown / blue

Public Description: 

This small globe-shaped earthenware bowl with a round mouth and no flare was produced in the ‘Remued’ ware range introduced by Premier Pottery, between 1941 and 1955 and is known to be part of the Later Series. It is characterised by its drip-glaze style, and in this case, colours of brown and blue have been used.

The 'Remued' ware in the City of Darebin art collection is significant as it represents fine examples from the nationally recognised twentieth century art pottery, Premier Pottery, that was based in the Victorian suburb of Preston from 1929-1956. Of great influence to the development of this range was the potter Margaret Kerr (1898-1958), who began introducing Australian imagery into pottery design.

'Remued' was one of Premier's most successful and defining ventures, a feat made particularly remarkable in that it survived the financial strains of the Great Depression. The work of Premier is significant in that although the firm was producing large quantities of commercial ware, they maintained a studio approach to their work, preferring handmade items as opposed to the use of plaster moulds.

Earthenware 'Remued' wall pocket vase, green / brown

Public Description: 

This wall pocket earthenware vase in a flattened conical shape was produced in the ‘Remued’ ware range introduced by Premier Pottery, between 1941 and 1955 and is known to be part of the Later Series. It is characterised by its drip-glaze style, and in this case, colours of green and brown have been used.

The ‘Remued’ ware in the City of Darebin art collection is significant as it represents fine examples from the nationally recognised twentieth century art pottery, Premier Pottery, that was based in the Victorian suburb of Preston from 1929-1956. Of great influence to the development of this range was the potter Margaret Kerr (1898-1958), who began introducing Australian imagery into pottery design.

'Remued' was one of Premier's most successful and defining ventures, a feat made particularly remarkable in that it survived the financial strains of the Great Depression. The work of Premier is significant in that although the firm was producing large quantities of commercial ware, they maintained a studio approach to their work, preferring handmade items as opposed to the use of plaster moulds.

Red Brick Bridge Over Darebin Creek

Public Description: 

The colour screen print Red Brick Bridge Over Darebin Creek depicts a charming view of the City of Darebin from the mid-twentieth century. With rolling hills and vegetation, it stands as a remarkably rural vista compared to the suburbia and light industrial setting of today. Created from 15 stencils, it is from an edition of 38.

Alan Sumner MBE (1911-1994) was born in Northcote, and was a significant Australian painter, printmaker, teacher and stained glass designer. After studying at the National Gallery of Victoria Art School, RMIT and the George Bell School in the early 1930s, he travelled to Europe and the UK, furthering his training at the Grand Chaumière and the Courtauld Institute. On his return to Melbourne, he took up an apprenticeship as a stained glass designer with Brooks, Robinson & Co, before becoming a designer for E.L. Yencken & Co. Sumner taught painting at the National Gallery of Victoria Art School from 1947 to 1950 and spent nine years as Head of the School from 1953 onward. He had a studio in Wellington Street, Collingwood, and completed around 100 stained glass window commissions for buildings including the Church of the Epiphany, Northcote, and St Gabriel’s, Reservoir. Sumner produced a large range of colour, multiple stencil screenprints on paper, of which many are held in major public collections around the country.

Sienna Earth

Public Description: 

Sienna Earth is a highly precise, intricate and colourful motif-based work that considers the damage and devastation Man has wrought upon the Earth. The solution, as depicted in the painting and represented by 100 interconnected masks, requires genuine communication and commitment between disparate global cultures to restore balance and harmony to the planet.

Caesar Sario’s art reflects his passion for the environment and endangered species everywhere. He draws inspiration from the concept that human beings can aspire to be at one with nature.

Sienna Earth © Caesar Sario

Bundoora Homestead

Public Description: 

Bangkok-born Srivilasa created the work Bundoora Homestead for a group exhibition held within the Access Gallery at Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2006. His work responds to the history and architectural features of Bundoora Homestead through the use of motifs associated with the Smith Family, owners of the property between 1899 and 1920. The blue and white cylindrical ceramic vase, decorated with the race and stud horse, Wallace, and a swallow and butterfly design found within the stained glass windows in the building, are surrounded by eight small white sculptural hands.

Wallace, who was sired by the 1890 Melbourne Cup winner Carbine, was a thoroughbred at stud at Bundoora Park from 1901 to 1917 and earned a fortune for the Smith family via successful progeny including the champion racehorse, Trafalgar. Portraits of both Wallace and Trafalgar are part of the Darebin Art Collection.

The swallow and butterfly featured in the stained glass windows in the Homestead are attributed to August Fischer, a renowned glass artist of the late 19th century in Melbourne.

Srivilasa’s art practice is predominantly focused upon ceramics, and also includes animation, works on paper and sculpture. His recent work explores ideas of contemporary social, political and ethical issues, as well as his experience living between his two homes; Australia and Thailand. This distinctive blue and white style pottery is based on the Thai tradition of making Chinese style ‘blue and white’ under-glazed porcelain, sometimes called Ming porcelain (although the style originated earlier in the Yuan dynasty (1271-1378).

The Provider

Public Description: 

The Australian landscape, scenic backdrops, costumes, masks and theatrical settings are woven into Papapetrou’s imagery, along with themes of children role playing complex narratives of loss, innocence, body, veil and dream. Presenting these sometimes unsettling themes is the intention of the artist’s work. This large digital photographic print, The Provider, from the series Between Worlds (2009-2012), depicts two school girls, both wearing horse head masks, positioned in the foreground of a Victorian High Country location.