Darebin Art Collection

Florentine’s Espresso Bar (and 24 Hour Burger and Pool Hall) in High Street

Public Description: 

The photograph, Florentine’s Espresso Bar (and 24 Hour Burger and Pool Hall) in High Street, is from a series of photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The suburb of Northcote experienced an influx of Greek and Italian immigrants in the postwar decades; in 1961 9.5% of the municipality's population was Italian-born. Establishments like Florentine's connected the Italian immigrant community and had the added benefit of introducing other communities to new cuisines and cultural experiences. http://www.emelbourne.net.au/biogs/EM01066b.htm

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Florentine’s Espresso Bar (and 24 Hour Burger and Pool Hall) in High Street © David Wadelton

Stepping out, High Street Northcote

Public Description: 

The photograph, Stepping out, High Street Northcote, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

This older couple walk arm in arm in busy High Street. Shopping, running errands or on their way to an appointment, they are focused and seemingly not aware of the photographer.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Stepping out, High Street Northcote © David Wadelton

The Peacock Inn

Public Description: 

The photograph, The Peacock Inn, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The Peacock Inn was built in 1854 by Horace and Edwin Bastings. The following year, they sold it to a 21 year old by the name of Geroge Plant. Holding the licence until his death in 1895, Plant was to become synonymous with The Peacock. His widow, Catherine, took over the hotel licence after his passing until 1910. She relinquished the license and was replaced by Georgina Hore who remained there until 1917. During the 1920s Martha Coghlin became the new owner and publican. She was to remain there until after the Second World War, although not always as the publican. It was during her ownership that the hotel underwent renovations. The hotel was renovated again during the 1990s although it subsequently received some damage due to a fire. http://peacockinnhotel.com.au/the-hotel/ http://www.wikinorthia.net.au/peacock-inn-hotel/

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

The Peacock Inn © David Wadelton

Clarke Street Boarding House

Public Description: 

The photograph, Clarke Street Boarding House, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

Images of disadvantaged people such as this man sitting on the front step of a Clarke Street boarding house, respresnts the pre-gentrified Northcote. By the mid 1970s Northcote had more overseas-born residents, more elderly citizens, many more flats, and a higher percentage of blue-collar workers than Melbourne as a whole. The closiong down of industries in the area would have led to unemployment and the need for cheap accommodation for those in crisis. http://www.emelbourne.net.au/biogs/EM01066b.htm

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Clarke Street Boarding House © David Wadelton

Car crash, St. Georges Road

Public Description: 

The photograph, Car crash, St. Georges Road, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

A group of local residents look on at the scene of a car in the front yard of a house. The car has crashed through the house's fencing which has wrapped around the front windscreen and bonnet. The P plate on the front grill of the Ford LTD gives us a clue as to who the driver may have been. The drivers' side door is open, however its hard to tell if anyone is still in the car.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Car crash, St. Georges Road © David Wadelton

A View from the Westbourne Grove rail bridge

Public Description: 

The photograph, A View from the Westbourne Grove rail bridge, is from a series of photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The overhead view of a "Red Rattler" train traveling down the Epping line reminds us fondly of the old Tait Class trains that were introduced by the Victorian Railways in 1910. Wooden bodied and painted red, these were steam locomotives hauling cars, that were eventually converted to electric traction in 1919. The first cars were built during 1909 with the last entering service in 1951 and the phasing out of the Class from 1974. The trains were initially known as "Sliding Door" trains, as opposed to the "Swing Door" trains in service before them. From the 1950s they were also known as "Red Rattlers" or "Reds" when the new blue Harris Class of trains were introduced.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Train source information: http://melbourneoldschooler.blogspot.com.au/p/train-history.html

A View from the Westbourne Grove rail bridge © David Wadelton

Portrait of Wallace

Public Description: 

Wallace, the renowned stud thoroughbred, was the son of 1890 Melbourne Cup winner, Carbine, and is buried near the stables at Bundoora Park. Owned by J.M.V. Smith, original owner of Bundoora Homestead and Park and prominent horse breeding and racing industry identity, Wallace died in late 1917, aged 25.

From 1903 to 1915, Wallace was one of the most sought after breeding stallions in Australia and in 1915-16 he topped the Australian sire list with his progeny including Melbourne Cup winners Kingsburgh (1914) and Patrobas (1915). He competed in at least 949 races and won close to £250,000 in prize money.

The artist Mark Gawen was born in South Australia in 1861. He was best known as a sporting artist and was mostly self-taught apart from studying in Paris for a short time in 1891 during his thirties. He received commissions to paint many of the top race horses of his period. Gawen lived most of his life in Victoria and died in 1943.

Winter Posy

Public Description: 

In Winter Posy, Kate Hudson blends a cheerful bouquet of blooms together in warm citrus shades of orange and yellow. This vibrant acknowledgment of nature’s ability to flourish and inspire, regardless of seasonal change, is displayed in a rectangular shaped vase featuring a black and white Art Deco style design. The balance and harmony of Hudson’s compositions, together with her use of colour accents, form the basis of her highly decorative and patterned prints. The result, when combined with a distinctive geometric motif, is the creation of a traditional floral still life with a contemporary twist.

Kate Hudson is a Melbourne based printmaker who trained in textile design at London’s Central School of Art & Design prior to immigrating to Australia in 1990. Focussing on pattern, design and colour, Hudson specialises in multi coloured linocut reduction prints taking inspiration for her work from the Arts & Crafts Movement, Japanese woodblocks and printmakers such as Margaret Preston (1875-1963). Hudson’s commercial collaborations with Catherine Manuell and Earth Greetings feature some of her most recognisable designs on a range of fashion accessories and greetings cards.

Since 2003 Hudson has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions around Victoria. Her artwork is held in a number of public, corporate and private collections including the National Gallery of Australia, Australian Print Workshop, Geelong Gallery, Austin Hospital, Australian Unity, Crown Casino and several local councils.

Winter Posy © Kate Hudson

Lyric Theatre at Merri Creek

Public Description: 

Lyric Theatre at Merri Creek (2003) comes from Siri Hayes’ Lyric Theatre series (2002-2004). This large digital photographic print is of a scene on the Merri Creek trail. Three people are placed near the creek, one watching the creek babbling by as two others near the large branch of a tree appear to be in deep conversation. The Lyric Theatre series examines human relationships and presence in an urban environment and this work, while being reminiscent of a film still or theatrical production, is open to speculation and interpretation. It invites the viewer into the drama from a position of familiarity with the local surrounds of the City of Darebin.

Trafalgar

Public Description: 

This is a portrait of the golden haired racehorse, titled Trafalgar. Trafalgar was one of the most popular horses of his time within Australian horse racing circles. From 59 starts he had 24 wins, 11 seconds and 6 thirds, his most significant wins being the Sydney Cup in 1909 and the AJC Queen Elizabeth Stakes in 1912. Trafalgar was a notable son of Wallace, who was the son of the 1890 Melbourne Cup winner, Carbine. In 1900, Wallace was bought by J.M.V. Smith, original owner of Bundoora Homestead and prominent identity in the horse breeding and racing industry and came to stud in 1901.

The artist Mark Gawen was born in South Australia in 1861. He was best known as a sporting artist and was mostly self-taught apart from studying in Paris for a short time in 1891 during his thirties. He received commissions to paint many of the top race horses of his period. The commission to paint Trafalgar’s portrait most likely came from his owners Messrs P & W Mitchell of Bringenlong, near Corryong. Gawen lived most of his life in Victoria and died in 1943.