Darebin Art Collection

The Peacock Inn

Public Description: 

The photograph, The Peacock Inn, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The Peacock Inn was built in 1854 by Horace and Edwin Bastings. The following year, they sold it to a 21 year old by the name of Geroge Plant. Holding the licence until his death in 1895, Plant was to become synonymous with The Peacock. His widow, Catherine, took over the hotel licence after his passing until 1910. She relinquished the license and was replaced by Georgina Hore who remained there until 1917. During the 1920s Martha Coghlin became the new owner and publican. She was to remain there until after the Second World War, although not always as the publican. It was during her ownership that the hotel underwent renovations. The hotel was renovated again during the 1990s although it subsequently received some damage due to a fire. http://peacockinnhotel.com.au/the-hotel/ http://www.wikinorthia.net.au/peacock-inn-hotel/

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

The Peacock Inn © David Wadelton

Jim & Pam in their High Street Fish & Chip Shop

Public Description: 

The photograph, Jim & Pam in their High Street Fish & Chip Shop, is from a series of photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

For over 45 years, Jim and Pam have served up fish and chips and other old fashioned take away favourites from their shop in High Street. This image describes the pair as they are, friendly and welcoming people.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Jim & Pam in their High Street Fish & Chip Shop © David Wadelton

Danny's Hamburgers by night

Public Description: 

The photograph, Danny's Hamburgers by night, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

Danny’s Burgers, situated in Fitzroy North, is a true Melbourne institution, perfecting their burgers since its establishment in 1945. They are known for their delicious, no fuss, home-style burgers and their shop interior which pays homage to the traditional American diner, with cherry-red barstool seating and 50s-era menu and iconic advertisements. https://smudgeeats.com.au/directory/melbourne/restaurants/dannys-burgers/

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Danny's Hamburgers by night © David Wadelton

Lane behind Northcote Theatre

Public Description: 

The photograph, Lane behind Northcote Theatre, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The Northcote Theatre was established at 216 High Street (corner of High Street and Bastings Street) in June 1912 by the Northcote Picture Theatre Company. It was designed by local architect, Edward Twentyman, jnr. and remains perhaps the earliest surviving picture theatre designed in Victoria. It possessed a balcony, stalls, its own electricity generator and a stage which was adaptable for vaudeville. For many businesses, laneways such as this one photographed by Wadelton, allowed rear access for deliveries and waste collection. It later beacame part of the Hoyts' chain of cinemas and while it was operating as a cinema, it was used as the setting for the film "Night Club" in 1952. The cinema closed in 1960. It has been used as a dance studio and having been extensively restored and refurbished to its original character it is now used as a reception centre. http://heritage.darebinlibraries.vic.gov.au/article/521

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Lane behind Northcote Theatre © David Wadelton

Looking toward Westgarth Street from South Crescent

Public Description: 

The photograph, Looking toward Westgarth Street from South Crescent, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The background to this image shows a vacant lot, where Leeds Dyeworks once stood and where an apartment block stands today.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Looking toward Westgarth Street from South Crescent © David Wadelton

Epping line train

Public Description: 

The photograph, Epping line train , is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The image of a woman smoking a cigarette in a train carriage is reminiscent of a time gone by, before smoking was outlawed in public places. It was commonplace for people to smoke at work, at their desks, in meetings, in restaurants, at parks and in public transport.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Epping line train © David Wadelton

Unknown child, Merri Station

Public Description: 

The photograph, Unknown child, Merri Station, is from a series of photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

A smiling toddler walks alone on the Merri Station platform looking. Merri Station is located on the South Morang line, in the Australian state of Victoria. It serves the north-eastern Melbourne suburb of Northcote. It opened in 1889 as Northcote, and was renamed Merri in 1906.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Unknown child, Merri Station © David Wadelton

The corner of Bell Street and Gilbert Road, Preston

Public Description: 

The photograph, The corner of Bell Street and Gilbert Road, Preston, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

A Golden Fleece petrol station stood as a landmark on the corner of Bell Street and Gilbert Road in Preston. The space-age circular petrol bay roofs were eye-catching in its design on this busy intersection. Other development has since taken over the site where the surrounding suburbs can still be taken in.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

The corner of Bell Street and Gilbert Road, Preston © David Wadelton

Merri Creek

Public Description: 

The photograph, Merri Creek, is from a series of photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

Merri Creek, shown here, is one of five major north south flowing tributaries of the Yarra River, flowing perennially from its source in the foothills of the Great Dividing Range to its junction with the Yarra River in present day Collingwood, just east of Dights Falls. The creek is approximately 60 kilometres in length, the lower 20 of those run through suburban Melbourne. The creek forms the Western Border of the City of Darebin from Heidelberg Road in the south to Mahoneys Road in the north. http://heritage.darebinlibraries.vic.gov.au/article/397

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Merri Creek © David Wadelton

The Commercial Hotel, High Street, Northcote

Public Description: 

The photograph, The Commercial Hotel, High Street, Northcote , is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

In December 1854 a liquor licence was issued for a hotel in High Street Northcote, to be named the Shannon Hotel. For the next forty years it operated under a variety of publicans, with Denis Hayes being the most prominent. Times were tough for the hotel in the late 1850s with both Denis Hayes and Henry Drowley becoming insolvent whilst running the hotel. By the 1890s the hotel was in a poor state of repair and the Northcote Council condemned the building, forcing its demolition. The hotel was reborn in 1894 as the Commercial Hotel. The exterior of the building remains much as it was in 1894.

In 1923 the hotel came to the notice of the local magistrates when publican Ellen Jones was charged with "...having persons on the premises during prohibited hours." Constable Dunn reported that he saw ten men leaving the rear of the hotel after hours. Shortly afterwards another twenty five men were seen leaving. Dunn entered the hotel and saw empty beer glasses and Jones and her daughters clearing up. There were no men in the hotel when the police entered and Jones denied serving alcohol after hours. The magistrate dismissed the case.

In 2005 the hotel changed its name to the Northcote Social Club. http://heritage.darebinlibraries.vic.gov.au/article/860

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

The Commercial Hotel, High Street, Northcote © David Wadelton