Darebin Art Collection

Earthenware 'Remued' barrel-shaped jardinaire, pale green / beige / pale blue

Public Description: 

This barrel-shaped jardinaire with a small collar lip was produced in the ‘Remued’ ware range introduced by Premier Pottery, between 1941 and 1955 and is known to be part of the Later Series. It is characterised by its drip-glaze style, and in this case, colours of pale green, pale brown and pale blue have been used.

The ‘Remued’ ware in the City of Darebin art collection is significant as it represents fine examples from the nationally recognised twentieth century art pottery, Premier Pottery, that was based in the Victorian suburb of Preston from 1929-1956. Of great influence to the development of this range was the potter Margaret Kerr (1898-1958), who began introducing Australian imagery into pottery design.

'Remued' was one of Premier's most successful and defining ventures, a feat made particularly remarkable in that it survived the financial strains of the Great Depression. The work of Premier is significant in that although the firm was producing large quantities of commercial ware, they maintained a studio approach to their work, preferring handmade items as opposed to the use of plaster moulds.

Earthenware 'Remued' baluster-shaped vase, green / brown / blue

Public Description: 

This small plump baluster-shaped earthenware vase was produced in the ‘Remued’ ware range introduced by Premier Pottery, between 1941 and 1955 and is known to be part of the Later Series. It is characterised by its drip-glaze style, and in this case, colours of green, brown and blue have been used.

The 'Remued' ware in the City of Darebin art collection is significant as it represents fine examples from the nationally recognised twentieth century art pottery, Premier Pottery, that was based in the Victorian suburb of Preston from 1929-1956. Of great influence to the development of this range was the potter Margaret Kerr (1898-1958), who began introducing Australian imagery into pottery design.

'Remued' was one of Premier's most successful and defining ventures, a feat made particularly remarkable in that it survived the financial strains of the Great Depression. The work of Premier is significant in that although the firm was producing large quantities of commercial ware, they maintained a studio approach to their work, preferring handmade items as opposed to the use of plaster moulds.

Earthenware 'Remued' globe-shaped bowl, brown / blue

Public Description: 

This small globe-shaped earthenware bowl with a round mouth and no flare was produced in the ‘Remued’ ware range introduced by Premier Pottery, between 1941 and 1955 and is known to be part of the Later Series. It is characterised by its drip-glaze style, and in this case, colours of brown and blue have been used.

The 'Remued' ware in the City of Darebin art collection is significant as it represents fine examples from the nationally recognised twentieth century art pottery, Premier Pottery, that was based in the Victorian suburb of Preston from 1929-1956. Of great influence to the development of this range was the potter Margaret Kerr (1898-1958), who began introducing Australian imagery into pottery design.

'Remued' was one of Premier's most successful and defining ventures, a feat made particularly remarkable in that it survived the financial strains of the Great Depression. The work of Premier is significant in that although the firm was producing large quantities of commercial ware, they maintained a studio approach to their work, preferring handmade items as opposed to the use of plaster moulds.

Earthenware 'Remued' cylinder vase, green / beige / blue

Public Description: 

This small slightly ribbed earthenware cylinder vase with a flared foot was produced in the ‘Remued’ ware range introduced by Premier Pottery, between 1941 and 1955 and is known to be part of the Later Series. It is characterised by its drip-glaze style, and in this case, colours of green, beige and blue have been used.

The 'Remued' ware in the City of Darebin art collection is significant as it represents fine examples from the nationally recognised twentieth century art pottery, Premier Pottery, that was based in the Victorian suburb of Preston from 1929-1956. Of great influence to the development of this range was the potter Margaret Kerr (1898-1958), who began introducing Australian imagery into pottery design.

'Remued' was one of Premier's most successful and defining ventures, a feat made particularly remarkable in that it survived the financial strains of the Great Depression. The work of Premier is significant in that although the firm was producing large quantities of commercial ware, they maintained a studio approach to their work, preferring handmade items as opposed to the use of plaster moulds.

Earthenware 'Remued' wall pocket vase, green / brown

Public Description: 

This wall pocket earthenware vase in a flattened conical shape was produced in the ‘Remued’ ware range introduced by Premier Pottery, between 1941 and 1955 and is known to be part of the Later Series. It is characterised by its drip-glaze style, and in this case, colours of green and brown have been used.

The ‘Remued’ ware in the City of Darebin art collection is significant as it represents fine examples from the nationally recognised twentieth century art pottery, Premier Pottery, that was based in the Victorian suburb of Preston from 1929-1956. Of great influence to the development of this range was the potter Margaret Kerr (1898-1958), who began introducing Australian imagery into pottery design.

'Remued' was one of Premier's most successful and defining ventures, a feat made particularly remarkable in that it survived the financial strains of the Great Depression. The work of Premier is significant in that although the firm was producing large quantities of commercial ware, they maintained a studio approach to their work, preferring handmade items as opposed to the use of plaster moulds.

Earthenware 'Remued' egg-cup vase, green / brown

Public Description: 

This small angular ‘egg-cup’ earthenware vase was produced in the ‘Remued’ ware range introduced by Premier Pottery, between 1941 and 1955 and is known to be part of the Later Series. It is characterised by its drip-glaze style, and in this case, colours of green and brown have been used.

The 'Remued' ware in the City of Darebin art collection is significant as it represents fine examples from the nationally recognised twentieth century art pottery, Premier Pottery, that was based in the Victorian suburb of Preston from 1929-1956. Of great influence to the development of this range was the potter Margaret Kerr (1898-1958), who began introducing Australian imagery into pottery design.

'Remued' was one of Premier's most successful and defining ventures, a feat made particularly remarkable in that it survived the financial strains of the Great Depression. The work of Premier is significant in that although the firm was producing large quantities of commercial ware, they maintained a studio approach to their work, preferring handmade items as opposed to the use of plaster moulds.

John Batman and his Party Encounter the Budgeroo of Bundoora

Public Description: 

Hybrid mythical creatures and giant Australian animals are common encounters in the artwork of Sharon West. Set in a traditional landscape, West presents a unique way of exploring the relationships between the white settler, Aboriginal cultures and the Australian landscape. The artist navigates within Australia’s colonial narratives to highlight the cultural conditions of settlement, and the accompanying dispossession of Aboriginal people from their land.

West’s artwork is grounded in satire and, at the same time, references Australian landscape movement paintings, reflecting colonial perspectives of history and myth, while imbued with the artist’s imagination and personal narratives. Offering re-imagined glimpses of Victorian history with people of the Kulin Nation, West creates statements about colonisation as an evolving historical and cultural process.

In appropriating history, West visualises and accentuates European mythologies; the notion of an uncivilised and empty land was the basis of colonial occupation and the formation of Aboriginal missions. In John Batman and his Party Encounter the Budgeroo of Bundoora, West conveys the idea of a dangerous and inhospitable land with an oversized monster, in this instance, a now extinct giant ‘Budgeroo’ dominating the landscape as encountered by John Batman and his party during their surveying of Port Phillip. The artwork was created first as a diorama revealing an artificial scene populated by plastic figures, a handcrafted ‘Budgeroo’ and painted background. The diorama was then photographed through glass, flattening the texture to further distort the legitimacy of colonial settlement.

West has developed a comprehensive and impressive body of work examining the relationship between settler and Indigenous cultures within the context of Australian colonial art history. She practices principally with the mediums of painting, assemblage and digital media. West has exhibited widely in Australia and has curated a number of exhibitions working primarily with Victorian Indigenous artists. She is the recipient of various awards including the Excellence in Conceptual Photography Award Kodak Salon (CCP, 2011) Bendigo Bank Emerging Award for the ANL Maritime Art Awards (Mission to Seafarers, 2011), and winner of the Darebin Art Show (2011). Her artwork is held in public collections including the State Library of Victoria, City of Melbourne and the Museum of the British Empire (UK) as well as many private collections.

John Batman and his Party Encounter the Budgeroo of Bundoora © Sharon West

Bundoora Homestead Welcome

Public Description: 

Hybrid mythical creatures and giant Australian animals are common encounters in the artwork of Sharon West. Set in a traditional landscape, West presents a unique way of exploring the relationships between the white settler, Aboriginal cultures and the Australian landscape. The artist navigates within Australia’s colonial narratives to highlight the cultural conditions of settlement, and the accompanying dispossession of Aboriginal people from their land.

West’s artwork is grounded in satire and, at the same time, references Australian landscape movement paintings, reflecting colonial perspectives of history and myth, while imbued with the artist’s imagination and personal narratives. Offering re-imagined glimpses of Victorian history with people of the Kulin Nation, West creates statements about colonisation as an evolving historical and cultural process.

In the richly textured Bundoora Homestead Welcome, West reflects on three distinct histories. Pre-colonial settlement is represented in the foreground by the land’s traditional owners, local Wurrundjeri Willam men, hunting for food when Mt. Cooper was an important ceremonial and camping ground. The middle ground depicts the occupants of Bundoora Homestead going about their daily activities; men astride horses and a woman promenading through the gardens with parasol in hand. The background shows Bundoora Homestead, a Queen Anne Federation style mansion built in 1899 as the centrepiece of 600 acre horse stud which was refurbished by Darebin City Council in 2001 as a public art gallery and heritage facility for the wider community to enjoy. Presented in an oval shaped picture frame, as was fashionable during the 1800s to the mid- 20th century, the word 'Welcome' is printed around the edge of the artwork in some of the most popular languages currently spoken in the Darebin municipality.

West has developed a comprehensive and impressive body of work examining the relationship between settler and Indigenous cultures within the context of Australian colonial art history. She practices principally with the mediums of painting, assemblage and digital media. West has exhibited widely in Australia and has curated a number of exhibitions working primarily with Victorian Indigenous artists. She is the recipient of various awards including the Excellence in Conceptual Photography Award Kodak Salon (CCP, 2011) Bendigo Bank Emerging Award for the ANL Maritime Art Awards (Mission to Seafarers, 2011), and winner of the Darebin Art Show (2011). Her artwork is held in public collections including the State Library of Victoria, City of Melbourne and the Museum of the British Empire (UK) as well as many private collections.

Bundoora Homestead Welcome © Sharon West

No Place for a Village

Public Description: 

Hybrid mythical creatures and giant Australian animals are common encounters in the artwork of Sharon West. Set in a traditional landscape, West presents a unique way of exploring the relationships between the white settler, Aboriginal cultures and the Australian landscape. The artist navigates within Australia’s colonial narratives to highlight the cultural conditions of settlement, and the accompanying dispossession of Aboriginal people from their land.

West’s artwork is grounded in satire and, at the same time, references Australian landscape movement paintings, reflecting colonial perspectives of history and myth, while imbued with the artist’s imagination and personal narratives. Offering re-imagined glimpses of Victorian history with people of the Kulin Nation, West creates statements about colonisation as an evolving historical and cultural process.

The inspiration for No Place for a Village is John Wesley Burtt’s Batman’s treaty with the aborigines at Merri Creek, 6th June, 1835 (c.1875), a European interpretation of a pivotal moment in history that underplays the onerous implications for the Indigenous participants who, within 25 years of signing the treaty, had been relocated to missions on the outskirts of Melbourne. On the banks of the Merri Creek, where it joins up with the Yarra River, John Batman balances precariously in the jaws of a giant eel grimly clutching his Treaty document. Aboriginal elders wait and watch with interest while Kangaroosters and other hybrid curios forage for food close by. A comical scene with a foreboding undercurrent, West shifts the balance of power to directly challenge the validity of the Treaty negotiations.

West has developed a comprehensive and impressive body of work examining the relationship between settler and Indigenous cultures within the context of Australian colonial art history. She practices principally with the mediums of painting, assemblage and digital media. West has exhibited widely in Australia and has curated a number of exhibitions working primarily with Victorian Indigenous artists. She is the recipient of various awards including the Excellence in Conceptual Photography Award Kodak Salon (CCP, 2011) Bendigo Bank Emerging Award for the ANL Maritime Art Awards (Mission to Seafarers, 2011), and winner of the Darebin Art Show (2011). Her artwork is held in public collections including the State Library of Victoria, City of Melbourne and the Museum of the British Empire (UK) as well as many private collections.

No Place for a Village © Sharon West

Mt. Cooper Estate

Public Description: 

Hybrid mythical creatures and giant Australian animals are common encounters in the artwork of Sharon West. Set in a traditional landscape, West presents a unique way of exploring the relationships between the white settler, Aboriginal cultures and the Australian landscape. The artist navigates within Australia’s colonial narratives to highlight the cultural conditions of settlement, and the accompanying dispossession of Aboriginal people from their land.

West’s artwork is grounded in satire and, at the same time, references Australian landscape movement paintings, reflecting colonial perspectives of history and myth, while imbued with the artist’s imagination and personal narratives. Offering re-imagined glimpses of Victorian history with people of the Kulin Nation, West creates statements about colonisation as an evolving historical and cultural process.

In Mt. Cooper Estate, West depicts a new housing development built on the north eastern slope of Mt. Cooper, an ancient land shaped by extremely powerful geological events. Standing at 137 metres, it is the highest point of landscape in metropolitan Melbourne and one of Victoria’s oldest, extinct volcanoes. Standing side by side in a uniformed pattern, large, modern homes of various types with manicured lawns and landscaped gardens are constructed on a place of great cultural significance. Mt. Cooper was an important ceremonial and camping ground and the site of an Aboriginal stone quarry and scarred trees. It constitutes part of the traditional lands of the Wurundjeri-Willam, a clan of the Woiwurrung language group that forms part of the Kulin Nation. Overlapping past with present, further up the hill, behind the water tower, are three Wurundjeri-Willam men, traditional owners of the land.

West has developed a comprehensive and impressive body of work examining the relationship between settler and Indigenous cultures within the context of Australian colonial art history. She practices principally with the mediums of painting, assemblage and digital media. West has exhibited widely in Australia and has curated a number of exhibitions working primarily with Victorian Indigenous artists. She is the recipient of various awards including the Excellence in Conceptual Photography Award Kodak Salon (CCP, 2011) Bendigo Bank Emerging Award for the ANL Maritime Art Awards (Mission to Seafarers, 2011), and winner of the Darebin Art Show (2011). Her artwork is held in public collections including the State Library of Victoria, City of Melbourne and the Museum of the British Empire (UK) as well as many private collections.

Mt. Cooper Estate © Sharon West