Painting

New Arrivals

Public Description: 

In New Arrivals, Gwen Garoni (1933-2014) depicts two tall ships in high seas approaching the coastline of Australia and considers the historical and contemporary politics surrounding ‘new arrival’s by boat to the nation’s shores. The work encapsulates the themes of maritime exploration, colonisation and migration and their effect upon Indigenous culture.

Aunty Gwen Garoni was a respected Victorian Koori Elder and a descendant of the Taungurong people of north-east Victoria. Her work reflects upon the significance of place, family connections and cultural identity. Her art is grounded in her love of country and explores the Australian landscape, ancestral memories and early colonial history.

Garoni was a winner of the DATSICC emerging artist award for the Gumbri White Dove Acquisitive Prize (2006 and 2010), a finalist in the Victorian Indigenous Art Awards (2006 and 2007) and a finalist in the ANL Maritime Art Prize (2009 and 2011). Her artwork is held in public and private collections.

New Arrivals © Gwen Garoni

Regrowth in the Yarra Valley

Public Description: 

Regrowth in the Yarra Valley is infused with optimism as the countryside begins the long process of revegetation after being decimated by the Black Saturday bushfires in February, 2009. Gwen Garoni (1933-2014) captures the majesty of nature’s rebirth as the flora and fauna of her Taurguron country begin to flourish again.

Aunty Gwen Garoni was a respected Victorian Koori Elder and a descendant of the Taungurong people of north-east Victoria. Her work reflects upon the significance of place, family connections and cultural identity. Her art is grounded in her love of Country and explores the Australian landscape, ancestral memories and early colonial history.

Garoni was a winner of the DATSICC emerging artist award for the Gumbri White Dove Acquisitive Prize (2006 and 2010), a finalist in the Victorian Indigenous Art Awards (2006 and 2007) and a finalist in the ANL Maritime Art Prize (2009 and 2011). Her artwork is held in public and private collections.
Regrowth in the Yarra Valley © Gwen Garoni

Bridge Merri Creek

Public Description: 

In Bridge Merri Creek, Katherine Hattam continues her exploration of local waterways and their locations. This work on plywood depicts the bridge over Merri Creek on High Street, Northcote with accompanying trees and powerlines and the much ignored cyclists dismount sign. It is surrounded by a repertoire of recurring domestic motifs significant to the artist including chairs, clocks and a shopping basket, creating a psychological layering of memory via personally symbolic objects.

Hattam’s art practice comprises drawing, collage, printmaking and sculpture. She employs a contemplative process in revealing the relationships and tensions between objects, space and placement. Hattam has exhibited widely as a solo artist as well as in group shows for over five decades. She has won the Robert Jacks Drawing Prize (2006), Banyule Works on Paper Art Award (2005) and has been short-listed in the Dobell Drawing Prize, National Works on Paper Prize and Arthur Guy Memorial Painting Prize. Her work is represented in public, corporate, educational and private collections such as the National Gallery of Australia, state and regional art galleries, The Darling Foundation, Smorgen Collection, Artbank, Queen Victoria Hospital, National Australia Bank and La Trobe University Museum of Art.

Bridge Merri Creek © Katherine Hattam

Reeds Japan

Public Description: 

Alice Wormald creates paintings out of a compulsion to construct strange natural spaces where surface and depth, representation and abstraction and naturalism and artifice converge. The works often develop through a process of image collection and collage with a focus on natural imagery such as rocks, plants and geological formations. These images are reconfigured to create a compelling encounter with depth, object and landscape. By accentuating and distorting formal elements such as composition and scale, the pictorial space is disrupted, demanding intense observation up close while simultaneously directing the viewer to make sense of the ‘landscape’ before them.

Her source imagery is often derived from photographs in nature journals. Curator Claire Watson in the Asialink/BLINDSIDE exhibition catalogue for 'Vertigo' writes: 'Within her work we see real and imagined geological formations and flora. The strangeness engendered through this process is one of subtle disorientation.' (2014, p.12)

Image © Alice Wormald.

Portrait of Wallace

Public Description: 

Wallace, the renowned stud thoroughbred, was the son of 1890 Melbourne Cup winner, Carbine, and is buried near the stables at Bundoora Park. Owned by J.M.V. Smith, original owner of Bundoora Homestead and Park and prominent horse breeding and racing industry identity, Wallace died in late 1917, aged 25.

From 1903 to 1915, Wallace was one of the most sought after breeding stallions in Australia and in 1915-16 he topped the Australian sire list with his progeny including Melbourne Cup winners Kingsburgh (1914) and Patrobas (1915). He competed in at least 949 races and won close to £250,000 in prize money.

The artist Mark Gawen was born in South Australia in 1861. He was best known as a sporting artist and was mostly self-taught apart from studying in Paris for a short time in 1891 during his thirties. He received commissions to paint many of the top race horses of his period. Gawen lived most of his life in Victoria and died in 1943.

Trafalgar

Public Description: 

This is a portrait of the golden haired racehorse, titled Trafalgar. Trafalgar was one of the most popular horses of his time within Australian horse racing circles. From 59 starts he had 24 wins, 11 seconds and 6 thirds, his most significant wins being the Sydney Cup in 1909 and the AJC Queen Elizabeth Stakes in 1912. Trafalgar was a notable son of Wallace, who was the son of the 1890 Melbourne Cup winner, Carbine. In 1900, Wallace was bought by J.M.V. Smith, original owner of Bundoora Homestead and prominent identity in the horse breeding and racing industry and came to stud in 1901.

The artist Mark Gawen was born in South Australia in 1861. He was best known as a sporting artist and was mostly self-taught apart from studying in Paris for a short time in 1891 during his thirties. He received commissions to paint many of the top race horses of his period. The commission to paint Trafalgar’s portrait most likely came from his owners Messrs P & W Mitchell of Bringenlong, near Corryong. Gawen lived most of his life in Victoria and died in 1943.

Sienna Earth

Public Description: 

Sienna Earth is a highly precise, intricate and colourful motif-based work that considers the damage and devastation Man has wrought upon the Earth. The solution, as depicted in the painting and represented by 100 interconnected masks, requires genuine communication and commitment between disparate global cultures to restore balance and harmony to the planet.

Caesar Sario’s art reflects his passion for the environment and endangered species everywhere. He draws inspiration from the concept that human beings can aspire to be at one with nature.

Sienna Earth © Caesar Sario

Powerlines Merri Creek

Public Description: 

Katherine Hattam’s exuberant work, Powerlines Merri Creek equalises the natural environment with man-made constructions as she explores the hybrid landscape of local waterways and their locations.

Hattam’s art practice comprises drawing, collage, printmaking and sculpture. She employs a contemplative process in revealing the relationships and tensions between objects, space and placement. Hattam has exhibited widely as a solo artist as well as in group shows for over five decades. She has won the Robert Jacks Drawing Prize (2006), Banyule Works on Paper Art Award (2005) and has been short-listed in the Dobell Drawing Prize, the National Works on Paper Prize and the Arthur Guy Memorial Painting Prize. Her work is represented in public, corporate, educational and private collections such as the National Gallery of Australia, state and regional art galleries, The Darling Foundation, Smorgen Collection, Artbank, Queen Victoria Hospital, National Australia Bank and La Trobe University Museum of Art.

Powerlines Merri Creek © Katherine Hattam

A Brief History of Preston

Public Description: 

In A Brief History of Preston, Warren Lane powerfully distills two centuries of European settlement in Preston, a northern suburb of Melbourne located in the City of Darebin. During the colonisation of this area in the 1800s, the traditional lands of the Wurundjeri-willam people were overtaken with farming and various other pastoral activities eventually leading to the industrial and commercial developments of the present day.

An Indigenous man stands erect in the foreground of the painting, staring straight ahead as if looking into the future or perhaps it is the past. Behind him are two potent symbols of “progress” represented by Holstein Friesian dairy cattle and Northland shopping centre (c 2010), looming cavernous and omnipresent over a vast, empty car park temporarily devoid of consumer activity.

As a painter working predominantly in oils, Lane creates intricate and familiar scenes linked by themes of the built environment, politics, human rights and social change. Lane’s astute illustrative portraits and urban landscapes are skilfully structured compositions that employ a high degree of realism laced with an undercurrent of satire. His work is both thought provoking and humorous, inviting the viewer to contemplate the subject matter without pretension or distraction.

A Brief History of Preston © Warren Lane