Photograph

She never speaks about herself, she could be anything.

Public Description: 

Lambe’s work 'She never speaks about herself, she could be anything.' was the recepient of the 2017 Darebin Art Prize. Lambe was awarded the prize by a judging panel that included Professor of Art and Performance at Deakin University, David Cross; artist Lou Hubbard and Curator of Bundoora Homestead Art Centre, Claire Watson.

Cross said of Lambe’s photograph, “The winning work demonstrates an extraordinary acuity, a stunning economy of image, text, materiality and concept. It evokes a quiet but sustained resonance and captures an illusion of visual complexity and haptic experience.”

Claire Lambe completed a Bachelor of Fine Art at Bristol College of Art in 1985, followed by postgraduate studies at the University of New South Wales in 1990 and a Master of Fine Art at Goldsmiths College, London in 1995. . At the invitation of Max Delany, ACCA’s Artistic Director and curator Annika Kristenson, Claire was commissioned to make a new body of work, Mother Holding Something Horrific for ACCA’s 2017 Influential Australian Artists Series and her Recent exhibitions include Miss Universal (with Atlanta Eke), Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne, 2015; Strangefellows (with Lisa Young) West Space, Melbourne, 2013; Melbourne Now, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2013–14. In 2016 Lambe was awarded the Sir Edwards Trust residency in New York.

Untitled

Public Description: 

The work involved a site specific performance by the artists (the carving or scarring of the tree) within the City of Darebin municipality. The material gathered from the object/subject of the performance (the wood chips) is also featured as part of the work alongside the framed photograph which informs the object and acts as a peripheral installation with the wood chips.

“The work we created centres around a statement which emerged from seemingly nowhere, about a scar tree. It relates to the nature of memory and the ways in which we place value on ‘place’ or site, both personally and culturally. With the statement as a conceptual anchor, we found ourselves engaged with an artistic process exploring the nature of site, gaze, presence, absence, law and order, authority and authorship. When thinking about the Bundoora Homestead site, we considered its history as a place including one for cultural expression from over 40,000 years ago, through to today. “

Fergus Binns is a conceptual painter whose work often explores depictions of colonial Australia and national identity. He holds a Bachelor of Fine Art (Painting) from the Victorian College of the Arts. His work is held in various public and private collections.

Steven Rhall’s recent exhibitions include group show ‘Octoroon’ at Ateneo Gallery Phillipines and ‘The Outcome of Walking Slowly Downhill’, a collaboration with Domenico de Clario for the 2016 Mildura Palimpsest Biennale. His work is held in various collections including the National Gallery of Victoria and the City of Melbourne.

Lane behind Northcote Theatre

Public Description: 

The photograph, Lane behind Northcote Theatre, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The Northcote Theatre was established at 216 High Street (corner of High Street and Bastings Street) in June 1912 by the Northcote Picture Theatre Company. It was designed by local architect, Edward Twentyman, jnr. and remains perhaps the earliest surviving picture theatre designed in Victoria. It possessed a balcony, stalls, its own electricity generator and a stage which was adaptable for vaudeville. For many businesses, laneways such as this one photographed by Wadelton, allowed rear access for deliveries and waste collection. It later beacame part of the Hoyts' chain of cinemas and while it was operating as a cinema, it was used as the setting for the film "Night Club" in 1952. The cinema closed in 1960. It has been used as a dance studio and having been extensively restored and refurbished to its original character it is now used as a reception centre. http://heritage.darebinlibraries.vic.gov.au/article/521

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Lane behind Northcote Theatre © David Wadelton

Looking toward Westgarth Street from South Crescent

Public Description: 

The photograph, Looking toward Westgarth Street from South Crescent, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The background to this image shows a vacant lot, where Leeds Dyeworks once stood and where an apartment block stands today.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Looking toward Westgarth Street from South Crescent © David Wadelton

Northland

Public Description: 

The photograph, Northland , is from a series of photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

Northland Shopping Centre was originally built and owned by the Myer Emporium. When it opened for business on Tuesday 4th of October 1966, it was Victoria's first and largest indoor mall shopping centre. The shopping centre was built on land sold by the Housing Commission that once housed the migrant camp of nissen huts built in 1952 to accommodate the influx of new Australians to Preston. The original shopping centre consisted of 3 malls radiating north, east and west from a centre stage area. Water features, such as this one, were prominant in the original design and construction of the centre however there aren't any existing fountains remaining on the site. It would have approximately 80 tenants and was estimated to cost 9 million pounds to complete. The site was bounded by Murray Rd, Hannah St, Wood St and Darebin Creek. In 1982 Northland was sold to the Gandel Group of Companies. Since then the shopping centre has had numerous expansions and renovations.http://heritage.darebinlibraries.vic.gov.au/article/393

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Northland © David Wadelton

Epping line train

Public Description: 

The photograph, Epping line train , is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The image of a woman smoking a cigarette in a train carriage is reminiscent of a time gone by, before smoking was outlawed in public places. It was commonplace for people to smoke at work, at their desks, in meetings, in restaurants, at parks and in public transport.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Epping line train © David Wadelton

Unknown child, Merri Station

Public Description: 

The photograph, Unknown child, Merri Station, is from a series of photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

A smiling toddler walks alone on the Merri Station platform looking. Merri Station is located on the South Morang line, in the Australian state of Victoria. It serves the north-eastern Melbourne suburb of Northcote. It opened in 1889 as Northcote, and was renamed Merri in 1906.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Unknown child, Merri Station © David Wadelton

Northcote Brickworks Quarry

Public Description: 

The photograph, Northcote Brickworks Quarry , is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

In 1866, clay for brick production began to be extracted from various holes in the Northcote area. The area known as All Nations Park, Northcote Plaza and the surrounding apartments and car park was once one of the largest brick producing sites in Victoria as it produced the most amount of clay. The clay hole dates from c1872 and at its deepest was 50 metres. The output of clay was staggering, with over 1.5 million bricks every ten days being produced for decades.

By the 1970s suburbia had surrounded the brickworks and in 1977 the quarry was sold to the Northcote Council for use as a tip. The unquarried area to the west of the site remained in the companies hands and included the chimneys and the brickworks buildings. Two years later this area was levelled and the site sold to developers. In 1981 the Northcote Plaza was constructed on the site of the former kilns. The former quarry ceased operating as a tip in 1998 and in 2002 was opened as All Nations Park. http://heritage.darebinlibraries.vic.gov.au/article/294

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Northcote Brickworks Quarry © David Wadelton

The corner of Bell Street and Gilbert Road, Preston

Public Description: 

The photograph, The corner of Bell Street and Gilbert Road, Preston, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

A Golden Fleece petrol station stood as a landmark on the corner of Bell Street and Gilbert Road in Preston. The space-age circular petrol bay roofs were eye-catching in its design on this busy intersection. Other development has since taken over the site where the surrounding suburbs can still be taken in.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

The corner of Bell Street and Gilbert Road, Preston © David Wadelton

Merri Station

Public Description: 

The photograph, Merri Station, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

Merri railway station is located on the South Morang line, in Victoria, Australia. It serves the north-eastern Melbourne suburb of Northcote. It opened on 8 October 1889 as Northcote, and was renamed Merri on 10 December 1906. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merri_railway_station

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Merri Station © David Wadelton