Local Artist

Northland

Public Description: 

The photograph, Northland , is from a series of photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

Northland Shopping Centre was originally built and owned by the Myer Emporium. When it opened for business on Tuesday 4th of October 1966, it was Victoria's first and largest indoor mall shopping centre. The shopping centre was built on land sold by the Housing Commission that once housed the migrant camp of nissen huts built in 1952 to accommodate the influx of new Australians to Preston. The original shopping centre consisted of 3 malls radiating north, east and west from a centre stage area. Water features, such as this one, were prominant in the original design and construction of the centre however there aren't any existing fountains remaining on the site. It would have approximately 80 tenants and was estimated to cost 9 million pounds to complete. The site was bounded by Murray Rd, Hannah St, Wood St and Darebin Creek. In 1982 Northland was sold to the Gandel Group of Companies. Since then the shopping centre has had numerous expansions and renovations.http://heritage.darebinlibraries.vic.gov.au/article/393

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Northland © David Wadelton

Dot, in her Charles Street Newsagency

Public Description: 

The photograph, Dot, in her Charles Street Newsagency, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

Owned and operated by one family for over 80 years, this newsagency was a popular store to buy your daily papers and general goods such as tobacco, confectionery and greeting cards. The image of Dot sitting at her dilapidated counter, with empty shelves and stock wrapped in plastic bags, we feel the business may be on its 'last legs'.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Dot, in her Charles Street Newsagency © David Wadelton

Merri Station

Public Description: 

The photograph, Merri Station, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

Merri railway station is located on the South Morang line, in Victoria, Australia. It serves the north-eastern Melbourne suburb of Northcote. It opened on 8 October 1889 as Northcote, and was renamed Merri on 10 December 1906. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merri_railway_station

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Merri Station © David Wadelton

Florentine’s Espresso Bar (and 24 Hour Burger and Pool Hall) in High Street

Public Description: 

The photograph, Florentine’s Espresso Bar (and 24 Hour Burger and Pool Hall) in High Street, is from a series of photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The suburb of Northcote experienced an influx of Greek and Italian immigrants in the postwar decades; in 1961 9.5% of the municipality's population was Italian-born. Establishments like Florentine's connected the Italian immigrant community and had the added benefit of introducing other communities to new cuisines and cultural experiences. http://www.emelbourne.net.au/biogs/EM01066b.htm

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Florentine’s Espresso Bar (and 24 Hour Burger and Pool Hall) in High Street © David Wadelton

Car crash, St. Georges Road

Public Description: 

The photograph, Car crash, St. Georges Road, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

A group of local residents look on at the scene of a car in the front yard of a house. The car has crashed through the house's fencing which has wrapped around the front windscreen and bonnet. The P plate on the front grill of the Ford LTD gives us a clue as to who the driver may have been. The drivers' side door is open, however its hard to tell if anyone is still in the car.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Car crash, St. Georges Road © David Wadelton

Merri Parade

Public Description: 

The photograph, Merri Parade, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

Merri Parade is a residential street joining St Georges Road and Westgarth Street Northcote. It follows the Merri Creek and crosses under the South Morang railway line near Merri Station via a rail bridge. The Parade is historically significant in the development of Northcote due mainly to the fact that one of the earliest rows of terrace houses were built in the area. It is thought there are potential archaeological remnants beneath the site of seven terrace houses, built circa 1890 and demonished circa 1980, that stood next to the current Albion Charles Hotel on the corner of St Georges Road and Merri Parade. http://vhd.heritagecouncil.vic.gov.au

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Merri Parade © David Wadelton

Northcote Brickworks Quarry

Public Description: 

The photograph, Northcote Brickworks Quarry , is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

In 1866, clay for brick production began to be extracted from various holes in the Northcote area. The area known as All Nations Park, Northcote Plaza and the surrounding apartments and car park was once one of the largest brick producing sites in Victoria as it produced the most amount of clay. The clay hole dates from c1872 and at its deepest was 50 metres. The output of clay was staggering, with over 1.5 million bricks every ten days being produced for decades.

By the 1970s suburbia had surrounded the brickworks and in 1977 the quarry was sold to the Northcote Council for use as a tip. The unquarried area to the west of the site remained in the companies hands and included the chimneys and the brickworks buildings. Two years later this area was levelled and the site sold to developers. In 1981 the Northcote Plaza was constructed on the site of the former kilns. The former quarry ceased operating as a tip in 1998 and in 2002 was opened as All Nations Park. http://heritage.darebinlibraries.vic.gov.au/article/294

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Northcote Brickworks Quarry © David Wadelton

The Peacock Inn

Public Description: 

The photograph, The Peacock Inn, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

The Peacock Inn was built in 1854 by Horace and Edwin Bastings. The following year, they sold it to a 21 year old by the name of Geroge Plant. Holding the licence until his death in 1895, Plant was to become synonymous with The Peacock. His widow, Catherine, took over the hotel licence after his passing until 1910. She relinquished the license and was replaced by Georgina Hore who remained there until 1917. During the 1920s Martha Coghlin became the new owner and publican. She was to remain there until after the Second World War, although not always as the publican. It was during her ownership that the hotel underwent renovations. The hotel was renovated again during the 1990s although it subsequently received some damage due to a fire. http://peacockinnhotel.com.au/the-hotel/ http://www.wikinorthia.net.au/peacock-inn-hotel/

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

The Peacock Inn © David Wadelton

Jim & Pam in their High Street Fish & Chip Shop

Public Description: 

The photograph, Jim & Pam in their High Street Fish & Chip Shop, is from a series of photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

For over 45 years, Jim and Pam have served up fish and chips and other old fashioned take away favourites from their shop in High Street. This image describes the pair as they are, friendly and welcoming people.

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Jim & Pam in their High Street Fish & Chip Shop © David Wadelton

Danny's Hamburgers by night

Public Description: 

The photograph, Danny's Hamburgers by night, is from a series of black and white photographs from the exhibition David Wadelton presents, The Northcote Hysterical Society which was shown at the Bundoora Homestead Art Gallery in 2015. These images, beautifully photographed and reproduced by David, are a wonderful look back at the seventies in and around the northern Melbourne suburb of Northcote.

Danny’s Burgers, situated in Fitzroy North, is a true Melbourne institution, perfecting their burgers since its establishment in 1945. They are known for their delicious, no fuss, home-style burgers and their shop interior which pays homage to the traditional American diner, with cherry-red barstool seating and 50s-era menu and iconic advertisements. https://smudgeeats.com.au/directory/melbourne/restaurants/dannys-burgers/

David Wadelton is a local Northcote resident, painter and photographer. Since the early 1980s he has exhibited extensively throughout Australia with regular solo exhibitions at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions from Vision In Disbelief, the 4th Biennale of Sydney in 1982, to Melbourne Now at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2013. A survey exhibition of Wadelton’s paintings and photographs, David Wadelton: Icons of Suburbia, was presented by McClelland Sculpture Park + Gallery in 2011. Wadelton has embraced social media in his practice, establishing The Northcote Hysterical Society in 2008, which now has thousands of members. He is represented in many state and national collections, including the Australian National Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. In addition to his career as a visual artist, Wadelton has made significant contributions to the field of experimental music in Australia.

Danny's Hamburgers by night © David Wadelton